The Norman Transcript

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June 26, 2013

Novel vaccine fights Type 1 diabetes by stopping immune attack

(Continued)

NEW YORK —

Patients taking a 1-milligram dose of TOL-3021 had their C- peptide levels rise 20 percent, compared with a decline of 8.8 percent for patients on placebo, the researchers reported. Immune cells known as T cells that directly targeted the pancreatic beta cells were shown to decline in patients taking the drug, while other T cells weren't affected. The study turned up no serious side effects.

Steinman said a next step is to conduct a longer trial with more patients to determine how the drug works over a period as long as a year, and to pursue treatment of patients at different stages of the disease.

"We do want to look at treatment of children, and the ultimate would be to see if we can treat those at risk before they get the disease and do this in a preventive way," Steinman said. On the other end of the spectrum, "it could provide benefit, as we've seen here, to people who were diagnosed a few years ago as long as they have some islet cells to preserve."

Steinman and colleagues formed a company around the technology in April, called Tolerion Inc. They are looking at partnerships with pharmaceutical companies "and other vehicles for moving ahead," he said. The company may be able to use the platform in other autoimmune diseases in which the target of the errant immune response is known, such as Grave's disease, he said.

"The wind at our back is the good data we've seen in this trial," Steinman said.

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