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August 18, 2013

Arab Spring challenging Obama policy

WASHINGTON — As Arab Spring democracy uprisings spread across the Middle East, President Barack Obama’s response to the political unrest has been to voice support for people seeking representative governments but limit the role the United States will play to shape those efforts.

The president’s philosophy of limited engagement is facing perhaps its toughest test in Egypt, where the nation’s first democratically elected president was ousted by military forces with deep, decadeslong ties to the U.S.

The White House has refused to declare Mohammed Morsi’s removal from power a coup — a step that would require Obama to suspend $1.3 billion in annual aid — even after the military-backed interim government led crackdowns last week that left more than 600 people dead and thousands more injured.

Obama’s resistance to suspending U.S. support for Egypt’s military leaves the White House with little leverage, effectively relegating the president to the role of a bystander issuing strongly worded statements. The U.S. position has also stirred up anti-American sentiment in Egypt, with Morsi supporters accusing the U.S. of failing to live up to its own democratic values by allowing an elected leader to be pushed aside.

The president insists that the U.S. stands with Egyptians seeking a democratic government. But he says America could not determine Egypt’s future and would not “take sides with any political party or political figure.”

“I know it’s tempting inside of Egypt to blame the United States or the West or some other outside actor for what’s gone wrong,” Obama said Thursday in remarks from his rented vacation house in Massachusetts on Martha’s Vineyard. “We’ve been blamed by supporters of Morsi. We’ve been blamed by the other side, as if we are supporters of Morsi.”

“That kind of approach will do nothing to help Egyptians achieve the future that they deserve,” Obama added.

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