The Norman Transcript

August 24, 2013

Duncan reeling from slaying

By Mike Smith
The Norman Transcript

DUNCAN — Many in this city of nearly 24,000 say they’re from “Duncan, America.” The proud phrase captures a community’s image of itself — and, in many respects, the reality.

But the murder that happened here last Friday — Christopher Lane, 22, was jogging along Country Club Road when a car drove by and someone fired a bullet into his back — has put Duncan on the world map in the worst way.

The killing — and Duncan — are still making international headlines. Stories about the murder of the college student from Australia, and three teenagers (Chancey Luna, James Edward Jr. and Michael Jones)accused of killing him in a fit of boredom, are shocking readers.

People in Duncan are shocked, as well.

“I know people who are now refusing to go out and walk,” District Attorney Jason Hicks said.

On Wednesday, Duncan schools opened to students for the second day of classes, but anonymous threats kept campuses otherwise closed. High school students were not allowed to leave for lunch, as they usually are.

Police Chief Danny Ford urged people to keep perspective. As tragic as the murder is, he said, one cannot draw conclusions that “all of society is falling apart.”

“It’s not the time to holler that Duncan has gone bad,” Ford said. “It’s just as good as it ever was.”

There’s not a lot of flash in Duncan. You might say it’s in the nation’s heartland, between Oklahoma City and Dallas. And while crime happens — even the occasional murder — there are civic clubs, well-kept parks and plenty of charity. High school basketball is big, but football is king.

Duncan is the oil town where Erle P. Halliburton started a well cementing business in 1919 that grew into an energy behemoth. The company still keeps a facility here, though it moved its headquarters to Houston years ago.

Most people in Duncan get along, and most will tell you it’s a great place to live.

“The citizens of Duncan know what kind of people we really are and that what has happened is not the norm in our community,” City Manager Jim Frieda said Thursday.