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August 17, 2013

Three-day marijuana festival, rally at Seattle park

SEATTLE — Thousands streamed into a Seattle waterfront park Friday for the opening of a three-day marijuana festival — an event that is part party, part protest and part victory celebration after the legalization of pot in Washington and Colorado last fall.

Hempfest is in its 22nd year of advocating for the legalization of marijuana, and this is the first time it’s been held since last fall, when Washington’s voters approved Initiative 502 and Colorado’s passed Amendment 64, legalizing the possession of up to an ounce of pot by adults over 21.

Both states are developing systems of state-licensed growers and processors, along with stores where taxed, regulated weed will be sold.

Vivian McPeak, Hempfest’s executive director, said this year’s event was dedicated to reforming federal marijuana laws — specifically, the removal of marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning a drug that has no medical benefit and a high likelihood of abuse. He asked festival-goers to make a voluntary $10 contribution to help offset the rally’s $800,000 cost.

“When we started Hempfest in 1991, many people thought we were jousting in the wind,” McPeak said. “What we’ve seen with the historic passage of I-502 and measure 62 in Colorado is that change is definitely in the wind.”

That was a sentiment shared by 21-year-old Giovanni Pelligrino and three friends as they sat on a driftwood log getting stoned.

“This year, it’s not really for us anymore,” he said. “It’s for everyone else, all the other states.”

“As long as it’s illegal federally it’s not really legal anywhere,” added one of his companions, Dean Bakeberg, also 21.

Technically, public use of marijuana remains illegal under Washington’s new law, punishable by a $103 ticket. But Seattle police have only been giving people warnings since the law passed, and they had no plans to write anyone up at Hempfest.

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