The Norman Transcript

December 4, 2013

OU gears up for regent meeting, TEDxOU and more


The Norman Transcript

NORMAN — OU Board of Regents to meet

Renovation, improvements and an addition to fine arts facilities at the University of Oklahoma are among topics to be discussed by the OU Board of Regents at its regular meeting today.

The meeting will begin at 3 p.m. in 618 Headington Hall with items submitted by Rogers State University, followed by those of Cameron University and then, those submitted by OU. Due to the prospect of potential inclement weather, members of the OU Board will work diligently to complete the meeting in less than an hour.

The board will consider a recommendation for construction management services related to the Reynolds Performing Arts Center Crawford Music Practice Wing Improvements and Addition project and the Fine Arts Center Rupel J. Jones Theatre renovation.

The Crawford Music Practice Wing includes the construction of a three-story music practice room addition on the north side of the wing, and the Rupel J. Jones Theatre renovation includes upgrades to infrastructure, such as refurbishing the stage lift and lighting and audio improvements.

The OU Board also will consider a proposal for an information technology network infrastructure refresh in for the National Weather Center in support of its academic, operational and research missions.

The next regular meeting of the OU Board of Regents is scheduled for Jan. 28 and 29 in Norman.

TEDxOU now

taking applications

TEDxOU will bring together the brightest thinkers and doers at its third annual conference on Jan. 24 at the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. The University of Oklahoma’s own independently organized TED event is accepting applications starting Dec. 4 at TEDxOU.com to attend the conference, which will showcase ideas worth spreading from speakers within the OU community and the Oklahoma City metro area. The speakers and attendees will create a cross-spectrum gathering of smart, curious, creative forward-thinkers, doers, innovators and artists.

“TEDxOU is a hallmark event at the University of Oklahoma that lives up to the broader TED mission of spreading ideas worth sharing,” Reneé Selanders, program manager at OU’s Center for the Creation of Economic Wealth and TEDxOU organizer, said. “With incredible speakers who will encourage attendees to see our world differently, TEDxOU promises an incredible day-long experience for attendees.”

The audience, composed of half students and half faculty, staff and community members, will have the opportunity not only to hear inspirational, boundary-pushing ideas come to life on the TEDxOU Stage but also to interact with speakers and forge connections with other attendees throughout the day. In keeping with this year’s theme, “Hello, World,” TEDxOU will debut a range of ideas from the following speakers, and more:

·Erin Engelke, vice president of public relations and communications at Feed the Children

·David Ray, dean of the OU Honors College

·Kevin Carroll, author and founder of Kevin Carroll Katalyst/LLC

·Nicole Jarvis, Norman physician and founder of local Parkinson’s Research Foundation

·Matthias Nollert, OU chemical engineering professor

·Matthew Burch, founder of Urban Agrarian

More speakers, including OU Student presenters, will be announced in the weeks leading up to TEDxOU on tedxou.com. Tickets to the event are $100 for non-students, and $27 for OU Students. For more information and to apply, visit tedxou.com.

OU to offer WaTER course

This spring 2014, the University of Oklahoma will offer a new one-credit introductory course, “Water, H2O, and WaTER,” about the significance of water in our world. The course will meet Wednesdays from 4:30-5:20 p.m. and students will learn about water’s beneficial uses as well as the challenges associated with water quality, scarcity, over-abundance (flooding) and inequities in access to clean water. It will also introduce students to the need to consider both technological options and cultural context in determining sustainable solutions to water problems.

The course is open to all majors and no engineering experience is necessary. The course will utilize both an online component and in-class component. Students will watch lecture modules, read assigned readings, reflect upon and analyze discussion questions and participate in classroom discussions.

For more information contact David A. Sabatini at sabatini@ou.edu or Jim F. Chamberlain @ jfchamb@ou.edu.

OU dedicates Tisdale health clinic

The OU Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic, established by the University of Oklahoma to address significant health disparities in Tulsa and provide quality health care to citizens of north, east and west Tulsa, is fulfilling that goal after its first year of operation. The clinic, named in memory of the late OU and NBA basketball star, Olympic gold medalist and musician Wayman Tisdale, was formally dedicated Monday.

“We are honored that this facility bears the name of Wayman Tisdale, who was well known for his caring spirit,” OU President David L. Boren said. “This clinic will allow us to provide better medical care for the citizens in the surrounding area.”

The Tisdale Clinic was built in response to a study showing a considerably lower life expectancy and far fewer physicians in north Tulsa compared to south Tulsa. The initial goal was to provide vitally needed specialty care for this underserved area. Today, the clinic offers treatment in 16 medical specialties.

OU physicians have conducted almost 12,000 patient visits at Tisdale in this first year of operation, with the majority from Tulsa, followed by Sapulpa, Sand Springs, Owasso, Claremore, Broken Arrow and many other towns across the state, including rural areas. The clinic is also becoming a regional health care destination, drawing patients from Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Colorado and other states.

OU-Tulsa President Gerard P. Clancy, M.D., said the facility is more than a clinic.

“It is hopefully the start of much more for north Tulsa in terms of economic development and livability. We’re proud that 25 percent of the Tisdale Clinic construction was done by north Tulsa businesses – the highest minority participation in Tulsa construction projects thus far. Eight members of the first construction crew were able to walk to work, and we continue to hire north Tulsans as support staff, nurses, and doctors,” he said.

Tisdale will also eventually be home to the Wayman Tisdale Foundation, formed after his death to provide funding for prosthetic devices for amputees across the country.

“We’re so happy that the foundation will continue Wayman’s legacy in the health center that bears his name,” said Tisdale’s widow, Regina. “He was always a great model for fitness and wellness. He’d be so proud to see our work to help those disadvantaged by amputation operating here, where such progress is being made to provide access to quality health care to this community.”

Funding for the OU Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic came from public and private sources, including the Oklahoma Legislature, University Hospitals Authority and Trust, the George Kaiser Family Foundation, The Morningside Healthcare Foundation, Saint Francis Health System, Saint John Health System, the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation and the Helmerich Foundation.

For more information about the OU School of Community Medicine, call 660-3098 or visit tulsa.ou.edu.

OU professor receives fellowship

A University of Oklahoma associate professor, Sarah W. Tracy, has received a National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellowship to complete a biography on nutrition and heart disease researcher Ancel Keys (1904-2004). The biography is tentatively titled “Health Revolutionary: Ancel Keys, Science, War, and the American Diet.” Few people have exerted more influence on American eating habits than physiologist and epidemiologist Ancel Keys.

Since joining OU in 1999, Tracy, associate professor of Honors and the History of Medicine and director of the Medical Humanities Program in the Honors College, has received two NEH Fellowships in support of her research. Tracy won an NEH Fellowship in 2002-2003 to support the writing of her book, “Alcoholism in America from Reconstruction to Prohibition,” published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2005.

“My biography of Ancel Keys is an extension of my longstanding research interest in the evolution of American eating and drinking habits and the ways they affect our health status and the definition and management of chronic disease. The methods I am using in my analysis of Keys’ life and work are those of the social and cultural history of medicine, food studies and biography,” Tracy said.

In the 1940s, Keys helped usher in the era of highly-processed, preservative-rich food through his development of the K Ration for the U.S. Army. In the 1950s, 60s and 70s, Keys wrote internationally bestselling cookbooks that introduced the United States and the world to the Mediterranean diet and heart healthy eating habits.

Nicknamed “Mr. Cholesterol” by the popular press, Keys appeared on the cover of Time magazine in 1961 as the man most likely to find an explanation for America’s No. 1 source of mortality (then and now), heart disease. He was one of the original and loudest advocates of diets low in saturated fat. Yet, the public knows little about this important American scientist, health advocate and author.

— Transcript Staff

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