The Norman Transcript

December 13, 2013

Missing man was on unapproved mission

By Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In March 2007, retired FBI agent Robert Levinson flew to Kish Island, an Iranian resort awash with tourists, smugglers and organized crime figures. Days later, after an arranged meeting with an admitted killer, he checked out of his hotel and vanished. For years, the U.S. has publicly described him as a private citizen who traveled to island on private business.

But that was just a cover story. An Associated Press investigation reveals that Levinson was working for the CIA. A team of analysts — with no authority to run spy operations — paid Levinson to gather intelligence from some of the world’s darkest corners. He vanished while investigating the Iranian government for the U.S.

The CIA was slow to respond to Levinson’s disappearance and spent the first several months denying any involvement. When Congress eventually discovered what happened, one of the biggest scandals in recent CIA history erupted.

Three veteran analysts were forced out of the agency and seven others were disciplined. The CIA paid Levinson’s family $2.5 million to pre-empt a revealing lawsuit, and the agency rewrote its rules restricting how analysts can work with outsiders.

But even after the White House, FBI and State Department officials learned of Levinson’s CIA ties, the official story remained unchanged.

“He’s a private citizen involved in private business in Iran,” the State Department said in 2007.

“Robert Levinson went missing during a business trip to Kish Island, Iran,” the White House said last month.

Details of the disappearance were described in documents obtained or reviewed by the AP, plus interviews over several years with dozens of current and former U.S. and foreign officials close to the search for Levinson.

The AP first confirmed Levinson’s CIA ties in 2010 and continued reporting to uncover more details.

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