The Norman Transcript

Nation/World

June 23, 2013

Plugging the leak

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Saturday sharply warned Hong Kong against slow-walking the extradition of Edward Snowden, reflecting concerns over a prolonged legal battle before the government contractor ever appears in a U.S. courtroom to answer espionage charges for revealing two highly classified surveillance programs.

A formal extradition request to bring Snowden to the United States from Hong Kong could drag through appeal courts for years and would pit Beijing against Washington at a time China tries to deflect U.S. accusations that it carries out extensive surveillance on American government and commercial operations.

The U.S. has contacted authorities in Hong Kong to seek Snowden’s extradition, the National Security Council said Saturday in a statement. The NSC advises the president on national security.

“Hong Kong has been a historically good partner of the United States in law enforcement matters, and we expect them to comply with the treaty in this case,” White House national security adviser Tom Donilon said in an interview with CBS News. He said the U.S. presented Hong Kong with a “good case for extradition.”

However, a senior administration official issued a pointed warning that if Hong Kong doesn’t act soon, “it will complicate our bilateral relations and raise questions about Hong Kong’s commitment to the rule of law.” The official was not authorized to discuss the matter by name and insisted on anonymity.

Hong Kong’s government had no immediate reaction to the charges against Snowden, a former National Security Agency contractor who admitted providing information to the news media about the programs. Police Commissioner Andy Tsang told reporters only that the case would be dealt with according to the law. A police statement said it was “inappropriate” for the police to comment on the case.

A one-page criminal complaint against Snowden was unsealed Friday in federal court in Alexandria, Va., part of the Eastern District of Virginia where his former employer, government contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, is headquartered, in McLean. He is charged with unauthorized communication of national defense information, willful communication of classified communications intelligence information and theft of government property. The first two are under the Espionage Act and each of the three crimes carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison on conviction.

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