The Norman Transcript

April 5, 2013

Ebert, film critic, dies at 70

By Caryn Rousseau
The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Roger Ebert had the most-watched thumb in Hollywood.

With a twist of his wrist, the Pulitzer Prize-winning critic rendered decisions that influenced a nation of moviegoers and could sometimes make or break a film.

The heavy-set writer in the horn-rimmed glasses teamed up on television with Gene Siskel to create a format for criticism that proved enormously appealing in its simplicity: uncomplicated reviews that were both intelligent and accessible and didn’t talk down to ordinary movie fans.

Ebert, film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967, died Thursday at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago as he was getting ready to go home for hospice care, his wife, Chaz, said in a statement posted on his blog Thursday. He was 70.

Two days earlier, Ebert had announced he was undergoing radiation treatment for a recurrence of cancer.

“So on this day of reflection I say again, thank you for going on this journey with me. I’ll see you at the movies.” Ebert wrote Tuesday on his blog.

Despite his wide influence, Ebert considered himself “beneath everything else a fan.”

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