The Norman Transcript

Nation/World

March 30, 2013

Impossible to forget

(Continued)

NORMAN —

“The news of the withdrawal gave us more strength to fight,” Minh said Thursday, after touring a museum in the capital, Hanoi, devoted to the Vietnamese victory and home to captured American tanks and destroyed aircraft.

“The U.S. left behind a weak South Vietnam army. Our spirits was so high and we all believed that Saigon would be liberated soon,” he said.

Minh, who was on a two-week tour of northern Vietnam with other veterans, said he bears no ill will to the American soldiers even though much of the country was destroyed and an estimated 3 million Vietnamese died.

If he met an American veteran now he says, “I would not feel angry; instead I would extend my sympathy to them because they were sent to fight in Vietnam against their will.”

But on his actions, he has no regrets. “If someone comes to destroy your house, you have to stand up to fight.”

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A POW’S REFLECTION

Two weeks before the last U.S. troops left Vietnam, Marine Corps Capt. James H. Warner was freed from North Vietnamese confinement after nearly 5 1/2 years as a prisoner of war. He said those years of forced labor and interrogation reinforced his conviction that the United States was right to confront the spread of communism.

The past 40 years have proven that free enterprise is the key to prosperity, Warner said in an interview Thursday at a coffee shop near his home in Rohrersville, Md., about 60 miles from Washington. He said American ideals ultimately prevailed, even if the methods weren’t as effective as they could have been.

“China has ditched socialism and gone in favor of improving their economy, and the same with Vietnam. The Berlin Wall is gone. So essentially, we won,” he said. “We could have won faster if we had been a little more aggressive about pushing our ideas instead of just fighting.”

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