The Norman Transcript

Sports

June 6, 2014

Myriad factors make Triple tough

NEW YORK — Three races in a five-week span at varying distances on different tracks. It’s so tough only 11 horses have won the Triple Crown, and none in 36 years.

It’s the longest span without a winner. Now it’s California Chrome’s turn to try on Saturday at the Belmont Stakes.

The striking chestnut colt with a blaze and four white feet appears to have rebounded well after two hard races in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, with the most exhausting still to come. He’ll run 1 1/2 miles around Belmont’s sweeping oval with 10 rivals gunning to keep history from happening.

Before Affirmed swept the 1978 Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont, 25 years had passed between Citation in 1948 and Secretariat in 1973.

Few can agree on what makes winning the Triple Crown so tough. Often it’s a combination of factors that help or hurt a horse, including racing luck and jockey error.

In 2002, War Emblem nearly fell to his knees when the starting gate sprang open, and jockey Victor Espinoza knew right then the colt was doomed. He straggled home in eighth place, beaten 19 1-2 lengths by a 70-1 shot.

Espinoza gets another shot on Saturday aboard California Chrome, who, if he wins, will have faced down the largest field of any Triple Crown winner.

“It doesn’t matter if there are 14 or six horses. He needs to break clean,” said Bob Baffert, the only trainer to lose the Belmont three times with horses that won the first two legs, including War Emblem.

California Chrome had been slow out of the starting gate in some of earlier his races because of his habit of shifting from one foot to the other. Espinoza will try to keep his head pointed straight and get him to show some early speed leaving the gate.

“With a clean break, he’s way better than all the other horses,” said Baffert, who will be watching from Southern California on Saturday.

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