The Norman Transcript

Sports

July 10, 2013

One last walk at Muirfield

(Continued)

NORMAN —

The press panned him. He recalls seeing other players mimic what he was trying to do with his swing. The worst of it was in the spring of 1987, when he arrived in the Atlanta airport and saw so many players headed east to Augusta National for the Masters. Faldo didn’t qualify. He was going in the other direction, to Hattiesburg, Miss.

“That hurt,” he said. “But I shot four 67s, and that was it.”

Starting with the ‘87 Open at Muirfield, Faldo won four out of the next 13 majors, lost a U.S. Open playoff to Curtis Strange and had three other top 4s in the majors.

But for someone regarded as one of England’s greatest golfers, Faldo had a prickly relationship with the press. It started during the rebuilding years, and it didn’t improve even after he had won two Masters and two Opens at Muirfield and St. Andrews. Faldo was aloof, which didn’t help, and he was sensitive when it came to his swing. It was a bad combination.

That led to his infamous victory speech at Muirfield in 1992, when he was a rambling mess with his emotions and his words after a wild final round where he nearly blew a lead that Faldo now says would have scarred him. His voice was unsteady, and he constantly fidgeted with his hair. Toward the end, he sarcastically thanked the TV commentators for telling him “how to practice and what to do and what not to do.”

“What can I say about the press?” he added with a grin. “I thank them from the bottom of my ... from the heart of my bottom, maybe.”

Faldo said he never watched the entire closing ceremony until a few months ago, when he showed it to his youngest daughter. He had no regrets.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Sports
Facebook