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February 25, 2014

Moore ER surpasses 3,000 patients served while $28.8M rebuilding project continues

NORMAN — Moore Medical’s temporary emergency department has been serving the public for almost three months now and the community is responding, Norman Regional Health system officials reported.

“We opened the emergency room on Dec. 2 and about 36 days after opening, we cared for our 1,000th patient — that was in spite of two ice and/or snow storms, Christmas and New Year’s holidays,” Moore Medical CEO Richie Splitt said.

Splitt heads the HealthPlex in Norman, as well as the Moore facility. Both are part of the Norman Regional Health System.

“In 81 days, we’ve surpassed 3,000 patients that we’ve seen, and that’s just in the emergency room,” Splitt said. “That doesn’t include the outpatient imaging — CT, X-ray and ultra sound.”

The temporary emergency facility is modeled after the one used in Joplin, Mo., after a tornado wiped out that city’s hospital. Both were constructed by Johnson Portables, a Michigan company that designed the special modular units.

From the outside, the series of buildings may look different than the average hospital, but once inside, people will feel they are in a typical hospital setting, Splitt said.

The temporary ED has all of the technology needed to serve emergency patients and outpatients needing imaging services.

“The community has responded very favorably,” Splitt said.

Before it was destroyed by the May 20 tornado, Moore Medical Center was seeing about 100 patients a day. The temporary facility is seeing about half that number, but the numbers are trending upward as word gets out that the facility is open.

“The patients who used the (Moore Medical) facility before recognize and appreciate that it’s the same staff that it was before,” Splitt said. “ It’s a little like coming home.”

Inside, the temporary medical facility looks and functions like a permanent hospital.

“We provide the same emergency care that was provided at Moore Medical Center before the tornado,” Splitt said. “We’re looking for that day when we might see 80 patients in a day. We’re looking for that benchmark. We’re building trust in the community with high-quality care.”

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