The Norman Transcript

Homepage

January 7, 2014

5 state properties listed on register

OKLAHOMA CITY — A Blackwell hotel once listed as endangered and a rare barn constructed in the 1800s have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places, a sign that shows the structures’ significance, the executive director of a nonprofit group supporting preservation in Oklahoma says.

The Larkin Hotel in downtown Blackwell was among five properties that the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office announced last week had been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The hotel, which was built between 1923 and 1924, was the first and only four-story building constructed in Blackwell. It was put on Preservation Oklahoma’s list of most endangered properties in 2012.

The James H. Bounds Barn in Marshall County was built around 1890. The four-crib log barn is the only one of its kind in Oklahoma.

“It means now two important structures have been deemed locally significant. It’s a recognition. It does not provide any sort of legal protection or financial assistance. It’s just a way of acknowledging that structure’s importance,” said David Pettyjohn, executive director of Preservation Oklahoma, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting preservation efforts. Preservation Oklahoma sponsored the nomination of the two properties.

The Cherokee Terrace Apartments in Enid was also placed on the national register.

The complex was built between 1936 and 1938 to provide affordable housing for people forced into poverty during the Great Depression.

Also placed on the register were two properties in Muskogee. The first, the Muskogee Municipal Building, was built in 1931 and is the city’s first formal city hall. The second property, St. Philips Episcopal Church, was also built in 1931. It is the only example of full-scale Tudor Revival architecture style in the city and is one of the few remaining historic church buildings representing African-Americans in the city.

“We’re excited about those getting listed because it’s been quite a while since anything has happened in terms of the community of Muskogee,” said Lynda Ozan, Architectural Historian at the State Historic Preservation Office. She said the listings are part of an effort by city of Muskogee to add more properties to the national register.

Breaking news, severe weather alerts, AMBER alerts, sports scores from The Norman Transcript are available as text messages right to your phone or mobile device. You decide which type of alerts you want to receive. Find out more or to signup, click here.

1
Text Only | Photo Reprints
New and Developing

Headlines

Sports
Opinion

Features

Must Read

Big 12 Media Days
Video
Raw: Families Travel to Taiwan Plane Crash Site Arizona Execution Takes Almost Two Hours Gen. Odierno Discusses Ukraine, NATO at Forum Gaza Fighting Rages Amid Cease-Fire Efforts Mint Gives JFK Coin a Face-lift Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers Ariz. Inmate Dies 2 Hours After Execution Began Crash Kills Teen Pilot Seeking World Record LeBron James Sends Apology Treat to Neighbors Raw: Funeral for Man Who Died in NYPD Custody Migrants Back in Honduras After US Deports Israeli American Reservist Torn Over Return Raw: ISS Cargo Ship Launches in Kazakhstan Six Indicted in StubHub Hacking Scheme Former NTSB Official: FAA Ban 'prudent' EPA Gets Hip With Kardashian Tweet Bodies of MH17 Victims Arrive in the Netherlands Biden Decries Voting Restrictions in NAACP Talk Broncos Owner Steps Down Due to Alzheimer's US, UN Push Shuttle Diplomacy in Mideast
Business

Photos


Facebook