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June 8, 2014

What will repeal of Common Core mean for your child?

NORMAN — A decision to drop Common Core academic standards in Oklahoma has left a wake of questions about what will happen in the two years it takes to implement new standards.

Will dropping the standards change what students learn in the classroom or how teachers teach? What will the new standards look like?

The picture grew fuzzy after Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill Thursday that repeals the controversial standards and gives Oklahoma until 2016 to craft replacement standards in math and English. She follows South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, who signed a bill on May 30 phasing in new standards by 2016. Indiana dropped Common Core earlier this year.

In explaining her move, Fallin said federal overreach has tainted what was once a state-led initiative to create rigorous standards meant to ensure students are ready for college or the workforce.

“The words ‘Common Core’ in Oklahoma are now so divisive that they have become a distraction that interferes with our mission of providing the best education possible for our children,” Fallin said in a written statement.

State Superintendent Janet Barresi came out in support of Fallin’s decision late Thursday, marking a change from her previous stance supporting the standards.

“At one time, as it was emerging from Republican and conservative ideas from individual states, I did support Common Core,” Barresi said in a news release. “As it has become entangled with federal government, however, Common Core has become, too difficult and inflexible.”

Here’s a look at what the decision means:

What changes will your child see because of the repeal?

The effects could vary depending on how far along your district was in transitioning to Common Core. Districts ready to implement the standards must revert to old standards, while those not prepared will see few or no changes for now.

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